STUDIO SIZED LESS EXPENSIVE THAN MOST ADDITIONS ROAD LEGAL
ECONOMICAL TO HEAT, COOL AND LIGHT TANGIBLE/LIQUID ASSET INDEPENDENT SINGLE FLOOR LIVING
STAY HOME WORK PHOTO ALBUM GETAWAY RELAX DETAILS TINY  WORKS! Cottage / Cabin Retirement Suite Luxury Retreat Bed & Breakfast Studio Workshop Office Retail Limitless Possibilities Classic  American  Railcars  Re-imagined
“So what’s a Bobber?” The North American railroad caboose has been known by many names. To some Railroaders it was simply called a hack, crummy or buggy. The version we have decided to build is affectionately called a Bobber. The name is directly related to the level of comfort enjoyed by the railroad crewmen who occupied it. The original small Bobber caboose had only two axles and four wheels. Unfortunately the short length of the caboose combined with so few wheels resulted in a ride that was somewhat uncomfortable. Every dip, joint and change in the railroad track was quickly transferred to the caboose and its occupants. This problem was alleviated somewhat when some Bobber cabooses were retrofitted with more wheels and axles. With our version of course we will never have to worry about bobbing about but we think it is just as cute and much more comfortable! The caboose was more than an office and place to monitor the train while underway. It was a dry, warm home away from home for the crew. A place to rest, eat and conduct railroad business. It was not unusual for crews to spend most of their working lives and long working days in the same caboose. Some employees even carried along their families inside! In may be that the caboose was the first North American “modern” tiny house on wheels pulled by engine power. We began our search for our next building project almost 20 years ago. As former railroad employees and owners of railroad equipment we know too well the difficulties, challenges and costs of the “real’ thing . While full size railroad equipment was far too large and costly to be practical for our plans, 19th century Narrow gauge equipment was just right. It was the perfect size and weight for moving over the road legally and required far less space to park. The problem was that if we wanted real narrow gauge equipment we would have to build it ourselves. It’s not that it does not exist anymore, it does, but the vintage equipment is highly coveted and sought by museums and railroad enthusiast organizations. The other difficulty we faced was collecting the information to build a new one accurately. Photography was a new technology when narrow gauge was at its peak so pictures are reasonably rare. Technical drawings, records, construction methods and materials varied widely and depended largely on who was building it and the area they served. Standards as we know them today simply did not exist. (Read more!)
ROUNDHOUSE WORKSHOP L.L.C. CONTOOCOOK, N.H.
Copyright © 2019 Roundhouse Workshop L.L.C.
STUDIO SIZED LESS EXPENSIVE THAN MOST ADDITIONS ROAD LEGAL
ECONOMICAL TO HEAT, COOL AND LIGHT TANGIBLE/LIQUID ASSET INDEPENDENT SINGLE FLOOR LIVING
TINY WORKS!
Classic American Railcars Re-imagined
“So what’s a Bobber?” The North American railroad caboose has been known by many names. To some Railroaders it was simply called a hack, crummy or buggy. The version we have decided to build is affectionately called a Bobber. The name is directly related to the level of comfort enjoyed by the railroad crewmen who occupied it. The original small Bobber caboose had only two axles and four wheels. Unfortunately the short length of the caboose combined with so few wheels resulted in a ride that was somewhat uncomfortable. Every dip, joint and change in the railroad track was quickly transferred to the caboose and its occupants. This problem was alleviated somewhat when some Bobber cabooses were retrofitted with more wheels and axles. With our version of course we will never have to worry about bobbing about but we think it is just as cute and much more comfortable! The caboose was more than an office and place to monitor the train while underway. It was a dry, warm home away from home for the crew. A place to rest, eat and conduct railroad business. It was not unusual for crews to spend most of their working lives and long working days in the same caboose. Some employees even carried along their families inside! In may be that the caboose was the first North American “modern” tiny house on wheels pulled by engine power. We began our search for our next building project almost 20 years ago. As former railroad employees and owners of railroad equipment we know too well the difficulties, challenges and costs of the “real’ thing . While full size railroad equipment was far too large and costly to be practical for our plans, 19th century Narrow gauge equipment was just right. It was the perfect size and weight for moving over the road legally and required far less space to park. The problem was that if we wanted real narrow gauge equipment we would have to build it ourselves. It’s not that it does not exist anymore, it does, but the vintage equipment is highly coveted and sought by museums and railroad enthusiast organizations. The other difficulty we faced was collecting the information to build a new one accurately. Photography was a new technology when narrow gauge was at its peak so pictures are reasonably rare. Technical drawings, records, construction methods and materials varied widely and depended largely on who was building it and the area they served. Standards as we know them today simply did not exist. (Read more!)
ROUNDHOUSE WORKSHOP L.L.C.
CONTOOCOOK, N.H.
Copyright © 2019 Roundhouse Workshop L.L.C.